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20130211
20130219
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
. and it was thanks to family and friends and my parents' church and sometimes even the state and local government that we were able to make it through. it was kind of a combination of hard work and determination and help and support by those around you. that's how i was successful. >> sinema got her start in politics in 2004, when she ran for a seat in the arizona legislature. >> i had been a social worker in a low income community for several years. and i started going down to the capitol to lobby to try and help change state policies so we could create more opportunity, so people could actually move from poverty to self-sufficiency, find a job, get on their feet, not need help from the government any longer. and when i got to the state capitol i got frustrated because i didn't think that many folks were looking at kind of innovation or change. so i thought, well i'll give it a shot. >> after serving in both chambers of the legislature sinema decided she wanted to change the face of congress. >> they seemed more interested in bickering than solving problems. and i thought, congress needs some mo
other republican women think about running for office. >> i see government as a tool to be able to help people. >> now i have an opportunity to join them to carry the torch for future generations for women and their families. >> hello, i'm bonnie erbe on capitol hill for this special edition of "to the contrary." there are a record number of women are serving in the 113th congress. twenty in the senate, 78 in the house. the 25% of the women serving in this session of congress are freshmen. this week we introduce you to some of them. >> i ran in 2006 because of my concerns of how our service members returning home from iraq and afghanistan were being treated. >> she didn't win in 2006. later me started working for the department of veterans affairs under president obama. but, duckworth decided to run again in 2012. >> and then when the wave happened in 2010, we had a lot of tea party congressmen who were elected, including the one who represented me who simply refused to do their jobs as congressmen and were very much ideologically driven as opposed to driven by the need to serve the con
, different culture and understanding what role government can and can't play when it comes to, you know, governing. >> and run she did. walorski served three terms in the indiana state house. >> we were a billion dollars in debt, we had very well intentioned people, everybody was doing what they thought they should do. our state was in the bottom of the barrel in this nation. we were 49th and 50th in virtually every grid you can imagine and today we are on the top five. so we really had chance to do some significant reforms in our state, balance our budget. today we are aaa bond rating, higher than the federal government. and, i'm proud, to be from the state of indiana because we have really been able to accomplish a lot with working together, living within our means, and doing exactly what we said we would do, which is to be one of the greatest job providers in the nation. >> walorski thinks indiana should be an example to the rest of the nation. >> we balanced the budget and we did it with bipartisan support and just very common sense people doing common sense things. hoosiers are kno
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)